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Profile picture John McCaslin
Chemistry Club in 1950
Thermite Experiment. Rather that repeat it here look in the forum under explosions.
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950
Flamming hands: This time Fred and I mixed Carbon Tetra Chloride and Carbon Disulfide in a beaker in equal amounts. We then lit it on fire by the flame of our bunsen burner. We took handsful of the burning liquid and let it run down our arms so that our arms and hands were covered in flames. When the liquid burned out we would dip our hand in again, and again. We were surprised that rather than feeling hot the burning flames felt as cold as ice water and were too cold to catch anything including our clothing on fire.
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950

Wallace wrote:

"Flamming hands: This time Fred and I mixed Carbon Tetra Chloride and Carbon Disulfide in a beaker in equal amounts. We then lit it on fire by the flame of our bunsen burner. We took handsful of the burning liquid and let it run down our arms so that "
Identifying an unknown chemical: Fred and I had Mr. Les Chapman provide as with a chemical we were to identify. We tried all the usual tests like color of flame as it was burned, etc. After about a month of Friday afternoons, and after-school research we had determined that it had potassium and Chromium, but we were not sure of all the other chemical it contained. Of course we did not have a spectrometer to help us. The last day of school we still could not completely identify it. It turns out it was potassium chrome alum and we had all the elements it contained but had never heard of potassium chrome alum so was unable to give it a name or even realize we had ALL the elements identified. It sure taught Fred and I a lot about chemical analysis. (And kept us from blowing up the lab with other spectacular experiments.)
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950
Looking at the picture of the Chemistry Lab at Central in 1914, it looks identical to the lab as it was in 1950. I can't tell from the picture if they were using aceteline gas in their Bunsen Burners. It was not till after 1950 that Moose Jaw had natural gas available, so the school had a large aceteline generator in the basement to provide gas for the lab burners. Waste liquids were poured into a wood trough lined with lead that ran at the back of the bench to a sink at the end.
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950
Mr Chapman sponsored the Chemistry Club in 1950. He had lost all the fingers but the little finger and thumb on one hand. But he could pick up a 5 gallon carboy of distilled water using that hand and tip it to fill a small bottle without spilling a drop. I could not even pick up a carboy of water with just a thumb and little finger, let alone tip the bottle to pour it!
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950
Mr Chapman taught all the classes of Chemistry at CCI in the 50's and early 50's. At the start of each class he would ask the first student a question on the previous days work. If the student answered it corectly the next student got a new question. If it was answered incorectly the next student got the same question until someone got it right. If yiou got yours wrong you had to come in after school and sit and study for a half hour. After that when you thought you knew the work you lined up and he would give each student another similar question on the same work you had missed. (He always remembered what it was and never wrote it down). You then went back to your stool and wrote out the answer, lined up and handed it to him. If not right you went back to your stool and studied at least another 10 minutes. then repeated the procedure until you got it right or 5 o'clock. If you did't get it correct you had to come back the next day and repeat getting new questions on that area of work. Of course if you missed another question on new work in your class that day you would have 2 questions to get right. Some students were there every night till five ALL year.
Profile picture Gord McCaw Re: Chemistry Club in 1950

Wallace wrote:

"Mr Chapman taught all the classes of Chemistry at CCI in the 50's and early 50's. At the start of each class he would ask the first student a question on the previous days work. If the student answered it corectly the next student got a new question."
Mr. Robinson carried on with that tradition when he became principal in 1967 (?). Detention could become a real tar-baby if you didn't get the first question on the first bounce. With Mr. Robinson it was math problems.
Profile picture Gord McCaw Re: Chemistry Club in 1950

Wallace wrote:

"Mr Chapman sponsored the Chemistry Club in 1950. He had lost all the fingers but the little finger and thumb on one hand. But he could pick up a 5 gallon carboy of distilled water using that hand and tip it to fill a small bottle without spilling a "
Legend had it that he had lost those fingers in a chem lab explosion as the result of an experiment gone wrong. Is that true?
Profile picture Gord McCaw Re: Chemistry Club in 1950

Wallace wrote:

"Mr Chapman taught all the classes of Chemistry at CCI in the 50's and early 50's. At the start of each class he would ask the first student a question on the previous days work. If the student answered it corectly the next student got a new question."
If I remember correctly Mr. Chapman retired as principal after the 1966 class year (my freshman year @ CCI). He was re-commissioned to take over the reins of the Grade 10 chemistry class due to Mr. Watson being away for three weeks.
The class was terror-stricken when the word got out that Mr. Chapman was coming back; with good reason, for many, as it turned out.
Mr. Watson was one of those guys who "couldn't get no respect", so there would always be lots of horsing around in his classes (I know, I was one of the "usual supects"). He could usually just barely keep the lid on things.
The very moment Mr. Chapman entered the classroom it was a completely different ballgame: hands folded, feet flat on the floor, no talking. It was as if Moses had come down from the mountain. The three week reign of terror was on.
He would pick out a victim and bark, "What is Boyle's Law? The student would stammer out, "Boyle's Law is when...", only to be cut off mid-sentence with, "Boyle's Law is not a TIME! Write it out ten times!!".
Another student would be called upon, "Boyle's Law is where..." The reply: "Boyle's Law is not a PLACE!", and the same sentence meted out.
I think you can see where this is going; he made good soldiers of us. When Mr. Watson returned, he gave us a test, the class average was up by about 40%.
When I look back on it now I think we were extremely fortunate to have had the benefit of the "old school" crew of teachers; tyrants, at the time, whom we whinged and whined about endlessly, but benefited from their wisdom more than we knew.
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950

Cheese wrote:

"If I remember correctly Mr. Chapman retired as principal after the 1966 class year (my freshman year @ CCI). He was re-commissioned to take over the reins of the Grade 10 chemistry class due to Mr. Watson being away for three weeks. The class was te"
A group of students, including Carol Chapman, had a party most Saturdays at one of our homes. The first time it was to be held at Chapman's home we were a little worried about what Mr. Chapman would be like at his home with all us teen-agers there. Well it turned out that when we arrived, he and his wife dissappeared upstairs and we did not see them or Dave Chapman, Carol's younger brother, for the rest of the evening. We rolled up the carpets and put on the old 78 records and had a dance. Food was ready for us in the kitchen.
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950

Cheese wrote:

"If I remember correctly Mr. Chapman retired as principal after the 1966 class year (my freshman year @ CCI). He was re-commissioned to take over the reins of the Grade 10 chemistry class due to Mr. Watson being away for three weeks. The class was te"
We always felt soory for Carol in the chemestry class. Her Dad always gave her the hardest question to answer, and was always harder on her in class than the rest of us.
Profile picture John McCaslin Re: Chemistry Club in 1950

Cheese wrote:

"If I remember correctly Mr. Chapman retired as principal after the 1966 class year (my freshman year @ CCI). He was re-commissioned to take over the reins of the Grade 10 chemistry class due to Mr. Watson being away for three weeks. The class was te"
As strict as he was in class, he was different when we had a party (dance) at his home.